Alerts

Heartbleed Bug - April 15, 2014

What is the Heartbleed Bug?

Heartbleed is a flaw in the programming on secure websites that could put your personal information at risk, including passwords, credit card, information, and emails. The Heartbleed Bug is a defect in encryption technology-called Open SSL- used by most Web servers to secure users personal or financial information. It is behind many HTTPS sites that collect personal or financial information.

Am I affected?

Solvaybank.com and bank affiliated sites (Online Banking) were not affected by the Heartbleed Bug.

Is my bank account safe?

Yes, consumers are always protected against any unauthorized transactions. Let the bank know immediately if you ever suspect suspicious activity.

What can you do?

It's always a good idea to regularly update your passwords every few months. Also, monitor your account regularly and report any suspicious activity to the bank immediately. Beware of phishing scams-or emails with malicious links-that attempt to get sensitive information from you.


Fraudulent Phishing E-Mail - June 1, 2011

Some of our customer may have received an e-mail that appears to be from NACHA indicating that a transaction they tried to process was rejected. Please see the warning below from NACHA and instruct the customer to not open any attachments.

These fraudulent emails typically make reference to an ACH transfer, payment, or transaction and contain a link or attachment that infects the computer with malicious code when clicked on by the email recipient. The contents of these fraudulent emails vary, with more recent examples including a counterfeit NACHA logo and the citation of NACHA's physical mailing address and telephone number.

NACHA itself does not process nor touch the ACH transactions that flow to and from organizations and financial institutions. NACHA does not send communications to persons or organizations about individual ACH transactions that they originate or receive.

Caution your customers not to open attachments or follow Web links in unsolicited emails from unknown parties or from parties with whom they do not normally communicate, or that appear to be known but are suspicious or otherwise unusual. Direct them to forward suspected fraudulent emails appearing to come from NACHA to abuse@nacha.org to aid in our efforts with security experts and law enforcement officials to pursue the perpetrators.

If malicious code is detected or suspected on a computer, consult with a computer security or anti-virus specialist to remove malicious code or re-install a clean image of the computer system. Always use anti-virus software and ensure that the virus signatures are automatically updated. Ensure that the computer operating systems and common software application security patches are installed and current.

Suspicious Telephone Calls Claiming to Be From the FDIC - September 1, 2010

The Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (FDIC) has received numerous reports of suspicious telephone calls where the caller claims to represent the FDIC and is calling regarding the collection of an outstanding debt.

To date, the callers have alleged that the call recipient is delinquent in payment of a loan that was applied for over the Internet or made through a payday lender. The loan may or may not actually exist. The caller attempts to authenticate the claim by providing sensitive personal information, such as name, Social Security number, and date of birth, supposedly taken from the loan application. The recipient is then strongly urged to make a payment over the phone to "avoid a lawsuit and possible arrest." In some instances, the caller is said to sound aggressive and threatening.

These suspicious telephone calls are fraudulent. Recipients should consider them as an attempt to steal money or collect personal identifying information. The FDIC generally does not initiate unsolicited telephone calls to consumers and is not involved with the collection of debts on behalf of operating lenders and financial institutions.

If a caller demonstrates that he or she has the recipient's sensitive personal information, such as Social Security number, date of birth, and bank account numbers, the recipient may be the victim of identity theft and should review his or her credit reports for signs of possible fraud. The individual should also consider placing a "fraud alert" on his or her credit reports. This can be done by contacting one of the three consumer reporting companies listed below. Only one of the three companies needs to be contacted. That company is required to contact the other two, which will place an alert on their versions of the report.

  • TransUnion: 1-800-680-7289; www.transunion.com; Fraud Victim Assistance Division, P.O. Box 6790, Fullerton, California 92834-6790
  • Equifax: 1-800-525-6285; www.equifax.com; P.O. Box 740241, Atlanta, Georgia 30374-0241
  • Experian: 1-888-EXPERIAN (397-3742); www.experian.com; P.O. Box 9554, Allen, Texas 75013